Movies That Should Be Musicals: My Best Friend's Wedding

Movies That Should Be Musicals: My Best Friend's Wedding

Movies That Should Be Musicals: My Best Friend's Wedding at WaterTower Theatre.  March 03, 2018.

Photo by Evan Michael Woods

Movies That Should Be Musicals: Practical Magic

Movies That Should Be Musicals: Practical Magic

Movies That Should Be Musicals: Practical Magic at the Ritz Carlton Dallas.  October 23, 2017.

Dallas Observer on MTSBM

Photo by Zack Huggins

Movies That Should Be Musicals: A League of Their Own

Movies That Should Be Musicals: A League of Their Own

Movies That Should Be Musicals: Practical Magic at the Ritz Carlton Dallas.  April 12th, 2017.

Scarlett O'Hara and the War on Tara

Scarlett O'Hara and the War on Tara

There’s simply no taking your eyes off of Mosley, who is never less than captivating. 
This Tara Alert is of the highest level: Scarlett.
-Mark Lowry, TheatreJones

Interview with La MaMa

 

photo by Erik Carter

Mo[u]rnin'. After.

Mo[u]rnin'. After.

Deeply felt, poetically written and beautifully constructed...If [Mosley's] other work is as strong as Mo[u]rnin’. After., which has the perfect amount of theatrical fringe on top, he's got a dream worth a keepin'.
-Mark Lowry, TheaterJones

To say he has a lot of panache would be an understatement...[A] beautiful curio—at once poetic, raw, and intimate...Mosley is yet a young man in the world of theatre but shows a talent and wisdom beyond his years. 
-Clint May, Chicago Theater Beat

Something deeply personal, moving and impossible not to identify with...a fast-blossoming performer whose insights into the intersection between loss and identity are worthy of an hour of anyone's time.
-Steven Chaitman, Windy City Times

The best of them is Mo[u]rnin’. After by Brigham Mosley. A memory piece about Mosley’s upbringing in rural Oklahoma where being a gay kid was nearly impossible, and his complex relationship with his grandfather (a man’s man whose death devastated Mosley), Mo[u]rnin’ incorporates a love of musical theater and glitter with a boundless energy that is both thrilling and exhausting to watch — Mosley really puts the “buoyant” in “flamboyant” … and the “flame” as well. (I’d never seen a man who could talk over himself until this.) It’s the must-see show of the fest.
-Arnold Wayne Jones, Dallas Voice

Mosley proves so instantly charming and at-ease he calls to mind another Dallas son, Michael Urie.
-Lindsey Wilson, culturemap

 

photo by Erik Carter

VULTURES

VULTURES

Imagine if the Rude Mechs had a love child with Taylor Mac (or Daniel Alexander Jones), and then named Young Jean Lee the godmother. You might find him crawling around Dallas theater today introducing himself as Brigham Mosley. Of course, you won't need to know the cultural lineage of Mosley's new play, Vultures, to recognize its magic.
-Lauren Smart, Dallas Observer

 

photo by Scott Wayne McDaniel

#basic

#basic

What could have easily been a play ripping apart a generation of young people — which at times it is — it also straddles a line and explores the fear in every young person’s mind of not having a lasting legacy.

-Paige Skinner, Dallas Observer

 

photo by Culture Nugget

Pretty, Smart, Poetic

Pretty, Smart, Poetic

This is a smart and beautifully rendered work of poetic theater.  Mosley creates a world where characters speak in verse, where the Kama Sutra or Annie Hall might fall from the sky (requisite guides to anyone's coming-of-age, I'd think).  Mosley understand[s] that the theater is a place to make magic, to pursue what might seem an impossible hope. Mosley is ultimately exploring what it means to shape a self that resists a parent's vision - how terrifying, yet liberating, that can be.  He understands too that, while risky, this resistance is something to celebrate.
-Suzanne Scanlon, Time Out Chicago

I was quite taken with Pretty, Smart, Poetic.  Odradek Theatre and playwright Brigham Mosley: both worth keeping your eye on.
-Kris Vire, Theatre Editor, Time Out Chicago